Storyology National Slide Night 2015

Welcome to the home of Storyology National Slide Night 2015.   The 23 entries will take you from the Sydney Easter Show through rural Australia and on to the busy streets of India, the waterways of Indonesia and the war zone in Gaza.  Covering important issues including civil liberties, racism, single-parent families and immigration, the slides are filled with interesting and inspiring characters and collectors. Please note that the views expressed in entrants statements are not the views of the Walkley Foundation.

Congratulations to our 2015 winners:

National Winner:

JUSTIN MCMANUS, Bonnie Doon: How’s the Serenity

Bonnie Doon: How’s the Serenity is a tongue-in-cheek look at the town that was made famous in the Australian film “The Castle”. I pitched this story to my picture editor in early January when news is usually slow and the news desk is always looking for lighthearted stories about people on holidays and the like.

It was a simple concept: go to Bonnie Doon, hang out and ask people if they were feeling the serenity.

The resulting story and slideshow, which is narrated by Michael Caton, the actor who played Daryl Kerrigan in the movie and coined the phrase “How’s the serenity”, is a laconic look at the town and its inhabitants and holiday makers during the summer break.

Bonnie Doon: How’s the Serenity, Justin McManus from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

Judges’ comments:

“With a beautifully written script, the judges chose “Bonnie Doon: how’s the serenity” for its excellent narrative, and the fun it evoked.  Nick Moir said it was “an enjoyable essay with as much effort put into the audio narrations as well as the curious and funny stills.”  The judges agreed it was nice to revisit one of their favourite films and add reality to the famed “holiday spot”.

Quote from winning photographer, Justin McManus:

“[I’m] very happy to win this award and to read the judges comments. It’s a exciting  time to be a photojournalist and to have access to the different media and platforms. It allows us to develop new ways of telling stories and to develop an engaging narrative with our readers that previously we didn’t have.”


 

People’s Choice Award Winner:

DEAN SAFFRON, The spokesman

I simply had to make this video after meeting “James” a very enigmatic man who has taken it upon himself to collect one bicycle from each developmental epoch for future generations to enjoy, a kind of time capsule if you will!

The spokesman, Dean Saffron from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.


All entrants:

TRACEY CROKE, Portrait to Keep

In this digital age, a photograph is nothing more than a fleeting moment for people who live in remote isolated regions. A beep, a click, a gathering and excited eyes widen at your camera’s LCD screen. Then you leave and the moment, for them, is gone forever.  At first the children and families stared blankly at the small rectangle of white shiny paper handed to them. This is the story of the moment they realised it was their own portrait to keep.

Portrait to Keep, Tracey Croke from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

QUENTIN JONES, Woodchopping

I was covering the Woodchopping for the RAS at this year’s Royal Sydney Easter Show, and the event is full of great pics…

Woodchopping, Quentin Jones from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

ZOE REYNOLDS, Ambo: the convicted people smuggler protests his innocence

Ambo Asse spent three years in an Australian prison convicted of people smuggling. He says, like so many others, he was conned into crewing the vessel. He still maintains his innocence.  Ambo takes us to his old home in Jakarta’s impoverished Kamal Muara and the fishing port where he was first recruited.

Ambo: the convicted people smuggler protests his innocence, Zoe Reynolds from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

YASMIN NOONE, A single-parent family, by choice

An increasing number of single women are taking their destiny and fertility into their own hands and getting pregnant using donor sperm. Socially on the out and often negativley judged, single women risk a lot in pursuing their desire to experience motherhood.

‘Single mother by choice’, Liza, chats to journalist Yasmin Noone about her journey to motherhood: from being a single 30-something-year-old woman looking for Mr Right through to her current life as a contented mum to daughter, Lola (and all of that clinical fertility treatment in-between).

A single-parent family, by choice, Yasmine Noone from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

PHILLIP BELL, River Stories

The Murray-Darling River system is in crisis. However beautiful they may look, the vast catchment for these arteries of the South-East cannot supply enough water for the rivers’ health. The slide sequence shows the cycles of drought and wet that the Murray-Darling enjoy and endure, asking whether they will survive

River Stories, Phillip Bell from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

PETE LONGWORTH, No Direction Known

Shot as a personal side-project while travelling for a friend’s wedding, its a classic tale of girl breaks up with boy and then travels to India to find [or lose] herself. A simple enough story until ‘life imitated art’ and Pete found himself breaking up with his beloved mid adventure.

A hand-crafted collaboration with editor [and groom] Christopher Baron, the piece is created entirely from still images. It’s a signature style Pete refers to as a FLIP BOOK.

No Direction Known, Pete Longworth from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

NICOLAS WALKER, Rite of Passage

Every summer in Australia, tens of thousands of teenagers make a pilgrimage to Schoolies, a week-long high school graduation party.
The tradition has its roots at Surfers Paradise in Queensland in the early 1980’s and has since expanded to attract students from every corner of the country.

But, in recent years, a growing crowd of school leavers have abandoned the original destination and headed abroad to the Indonesian island of Bali.

The allure is obvious – cheap booze, tropical weather and few regulations.
The rowdy party is considered a right of passage for young Australians and, for most, it’s the first real taste of parent-free independence.
In 2014, more than 5,000 teenagers clogged Legian Street in Kuta, the epicentre of Bali’s nightlife.

Locals peddled drugs on the sidewalks, while the young Australians crawled from one air-conditioned club to the next.

Unlike previous years, there were no serious tragedies. For the most part, the drama consisted of vomiting and crying teens, impromptu tattoos, pickpocket attacks, a few brawls and handful of cases of dengue fever.

Rite of Passage, Nicolas Walker from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

NICOLA BAILEY, Birdman

I met Birdman by chance one day while walking through the East Village in New York City. I was intrigued by his store and fascinated by the character behind it. This is his story.

Birdman, Nicola Bailey from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

MOHAMMED MASSOUD MORSI, It’s only in Gaza you die twice

My wish is to leave you with a thought worthy of consideration, more important than what you have come here to do. This story is for the children in conflict all over the world, and mostly for the children of Gaza, to whom we have a responsibility to act, as if they were our own. In almost 20 years of working as a photojournalist I have come to the realisation that violence roots within us all and our responsibility is not just to watch in any way or form, it’s also to act. None of what is happening is external to any of us, even though there might be a large physical distance. Our silence in the Palestinian issue is the evidence of that and it makes us equally responsible for the terror inflicted upon them.

It’s only in Gaza you die twice, Mohammed Massoud Morsi from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

LISS FENWICK, Dreams of the Backwoods

Dreams of the Backwoods is a journey into the sentimental redneck culture of America’s mid-west, into a community of people who look to the past to define themselves, despite their place in modern suburbia.

Dreams of the Backwoods, Liss Fenwick from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

JUSTIN MCMANUS, Bonnie Doon: How’s the Serenity

Bonnie Doon: How’s the Serenity is a tongue-in-cheek look at the town that was made famous in the Australian film “The Castle”. I pitched this story to my picture editor in early January when news is usually slow and the news desk is always looking for lighthearted stories about people on holidays and the like.

It was a simple concept: go to Bonnie Doon, hang out and ask people if they were feeling the serenity.

The resulting story and slideshow, which is narrated by Michael Caton, the actor who played Daryl Kerrigan in the movie and coined the phrase “How’s the serenity”, is a laconic look at the town and its inhabitants and holiday makers during the summer break.

Bonnie Doon: How’s the Serenity, Justin McManus from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

JENNY TEMPLIN, Protest 2014

Ever since 1983 when my photographic career began I have been documenting protest. Never have I known a year like 2014.The Abbott government and its policies brought people out onto the streets to demonstrate over and over again – families, students, pensioners and doctors; all expressing their anger,dismay and concern.
Among their ranks were more marchers with white hair – some with walking sticks, even zimmer frames – than I have ever seen.
Everyone alarmed at this government’s impact on Australia.
People power in action.

Protest 2014, Jenny Templin from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

JEFF TAN, From the Edge of our Climate

Jeff has been documenting the effects of climate change in the Pacific nation states of Fiji, Tuvalu and Vanuatu. This is what he has witnessed.

From The Edge of Our Climate, Jeff Tan from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

EDDIE JIM, Hayden

Photographer Eddie Jim spent many hours up close and at home with 35 year old Hayden McLean, who is severely autistic, for a story on what it costs to take care of him.

Hayden, Eddie Jim from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

DEAN SAFFRON, The spokesman

I simply had to make this video after meeting “James” a very enigmatic man who has taken it upon himself to collect one bicycle from each developmental epoch for future generations to enjoy, a kind of time capsule if you will!

The spokesman, Dean Saffron from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

CHRIS PEKEN, The Samburu

The Samburu people live in northern Kenya, where the foothills of Mount Kenya merge into the northern desert, having reached Kenya some five hundred years ago. The Samburu relocate every 5 to 6 weeks to ensure their cattle can feed themselves. They are independent and egalitarian people, much more traditional than the Masaai. The men spend days and often weeks with the herd while the women stay in the village and look after the children.

The Samburu, Chris Peken from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

CHRIS HOPKINS, Trauma

The area comprising Uganda, Burundi, Rwanda, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Central African Republic (CAR) and South Sudan has been involved in some form of war since the early 1960’s.

Its people are continually faced with unimaginable violence on a day to day basis. Genocide, rape as a weapon of war, the recruitment of child soldiers..the list of atrocities is seemingly endless.

There is no quick fix for these people and ongoing counseling and assistance from outside programs will probably never erase the visions of their past horrors. Though it is clear it is a necessary piece of the puzzle in the constant battle to reclaim their lives.

Trauma, Chris Hopkins from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

CHLOE BARTRAM, Sparklebaby

Sparklebaby explores girl culture in Australia within the phenomena of beauty pageants, particularly those directed at the young. Through documenting child pageants, I seek to understand if participating in these events increases the pressure on young girls to conform to an idealised view of what it means to be female or rather, is it a celebration of girlhood? It is not about why they compete in child pageants, but rather, who or what in society is telling them to do so?

Whilst from an outsiders perspective pageants may appear unnatural, to the girls participating, pageants are not only fantastical but also mirror the expectations and demands of society, in regards to presentation, and serve as a worthy preparation for later life. A society that believes those who are presented well, who are thinner, or more conventionally beautiful are valued more.

Through allowing me access to their ‘competitive lives’ I have been enabled by these girls to tell their story, not just as individuals, but as part of a developing culture.

Sparklebaby, Chloe Bartram from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

BRIAN CASSEY, Lifestyle Choices

Tony Abbott’s insensitive at best comment about Indigenous ‘Lifestyle Choices’ brought reactions from Aboriginal leaders. This production asks the viewer to contemplate the indigenous populations choices and their connection to the land, their beliefs and lifestyle.

Lifestyle Choices, Brian Cassey from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

ANDY DREWITT, Freedom

Freedom, Andy Drewitt from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

AL BLOOM, Leard State Forest

The Leard State Forest in north west NSW is under threat from three coal mines, of which environmental approvals processes are under dispute. The local community, farmers, activists and the Traditional Owners of the area, the Gomeroi, have been resisting the increasing destruction of the forest, water table, and biodiversity of the region.

“It is hard to believe the stupidity, the backwardness, the ignorance of knocking down the Leard State Forest to build a coalmine in an age of global warming, when the coal should be staying in the ground. That is the fact of the matter. That coal needs to stay in the ground. We cannot afford to burn that coal because of the climate.” – Christine Milne, Greens MP

Leard State Forest, Al Bloom from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

PAULA HEELAN, Life in Rural Queensland

Paula Heelan is a freelance photojournalist based on a cattle station in central Queensland. These images form part of her work portfolio over the past 12 months.

Life in Rural Queensland, Paula Heelan from Walkley Foundation on Vimeo.

GLENN LOCKITCH, Redfern Tent Embassy One Year On

The Redfern Aboriginal Tent Embassy and its Sacred Fire for Healing and Justice was created on 26th May 2014 in Sydney Australia on the historical site of the first land granted by the Australian Government to Aboriginal people in opposition to a controversial multi-million dollar development by the Aboriginal Housing Company (AHC).

The Tent Embassy feels that the AHC under the management of Aboriginal CEO Mick Mundine has lost its original goal to focus on low-income housing for Aboriginal people and is non-transparent. A large concern for the Redfern Aboriginal Tent Embassy too is that the development could ultimately fall into ownership by a large corporate developer thus forever losing the historical Aboriginal site.