Storyology 2018 Speakers

Storyology, the Walkley Foundation’s journalism festival, is back, stacked full of big name storytellers and heading to Brisbane this July. The festival is part of our growing program of public talks and exhibitions that showcase great journalism.

This year, we’ll be taking Australians behind the headlines to see  what great journalism looks like, how it’s made, and how it impacts everyday lives in an increasingly uncertain world.

Storyology 2018 will take place in Brisbane on July 27-28 at Palace Cinemas at the Barracks. Sydney will also host three public events at various locations. 

Find a list of this year’s speakers below.

Explore the 2018 Storyology program.

Eventbrite - Storyology 2018

Rachael Brown, journalist, ABC & Trace podcast (@RachBrownABC) Avatar

Rachael Brown, journalist, ABC & Trace podcast (@RachBrownABC)

Rachael Brown is a broadcast journalist. In 2002, after graduating from RMIT, she began her career with the ABC, where she has held several postings, including Europe correspondent from 2010 to 2013. In 2008, she won her first Walkley Award for Best Radio Current Affairs Report, for her investigation into the Victorian Medical Practitioners Board whose negligence contributed to the sexual assaults of a dozen women. Rachael is the creator, investigator and host of the ABC’s first true-crime podcast, Trace, which won the 2017 Walkley Award for Innovation. The podcast also won two 2017 Quill Awards: for Innovation, and for Best Podcast. Rachael lives in Melbourne, Victoria.

Session: Killer stories: True crime & podcasts (Sat July 28, 3.00-4.00pm)

Matthew Condon, author & journalist (@MatthewCondon2) Avatar

Matthew Condon, author & journalist (@MatthewCondon2)

Matthew Condon is an associate editor at News Corp, the author of several novels and works of non-fiction, and the two-time winner of the Steele Rudd Award for short fiction. His novels include The Motorcycle Café, The Pillow Fight and The Trout Opera. His non-fiction titles include Brisbane and, as editor, Fear, Faith and Hope: Remembering the Long Wet Summer of 2010-2011. In 2013 he published Three Crooked Kings – the first instalment in a trilogy on the life and times of former Queensland police commissioner Terry Lewis, and crime and corruption in Queensland and NSW over a half-century. It was awarded the John Oxley Library Award 2013, and was shortlisted for several other awards. The second volume, Jacks and Jokers, was published in April 2014 and was nominated for a Walkley Award. The final instalment in the trilogy – All Fall Down – was published in 2015, and Little Fish Are Sweet, an account of writing the trilogy, in 2016. Condon has worked as a journalist for thirty years both here and overseas.

Session: Killer stories: True crime & podcasts (Sat July 28, 3.00-4.00pm)

Gary Cranitch, photographer, Queensland Museum Avatar

Gary Cranitch, photographer, Queensland Museum

Gary has worked as a wildlife photographer at the Queensland Museum for 35 years. His work has been published in Australian Geographic, Popular Science (US), New Scientist, National Geographic online and numerous other publications and journals around the world. He has also contributed to the Queensland Museum’s extensive range of natural history publications. Gary won AIPP’s award for Australian Science and Nature Photographer of the Year in 2008, and the Eureka prize for Science Photography in 2015. He was also the principal photographer for The Great Barrier Reef: A Queensland Museum Discovery Guide. Gary also runs workshops and seminars on underwater photography and digital asset management. “The natural world never ceases to amaze me,” he has said. “I feel privileged to have photographed so many different landscapes and animal species throughout my career.”

Session: Shooting the storm (Sat July 28, 12.00-1.00pm)

Danielle Cronin, editor, Brisbane Times (@DanielleCronin) Avatar

Danielle Cronin, editor, Brisbane Times (@DanielleCronin)

Award-winning journalist Danielle Cronin is the first female editor of the Brisbane Times, a Fairfax Media metropolitan news site. Before joining the digital newsroom, Danielle had a long career in newspapers working for regional, metropolitan and overseas mastheads. As a senior reporter for The Canberra Times, she spent seven years in the federal press gallery reporting on 10 budgets, three elections, the coup that ended Kevin Rudd’s prime ministership, the election of the first female prime minister Julia Gillard, and the Canberra firestorm that claimed four lives and destroyed about 500 homes. A University of Queensland graduate with majors in journalism and political science, Danielle has also worked as a journalist in Queensland and Africa when she was named the inaugural Independent Newspapers’ Fellow for Australia. Danielle has been a volunteer on the Women in Media Queensland committee since its inception.

Session: Saturday morning with the papers (Sat July 28, 10.30-11.30am)

Trent Dalton, feature writer, The Weekend Australian Magazine (@TrentDalton) Avatar

Trent Dalton, feature writer, The Weekend Australian Magazine (@TrentDalton)

Trent Dalton writes for The Weekend Australian Magazine. He’s a two-time Walkley Award winner; three-time Kennedy Award winner for excellence in NSW journalism and a four-time winner of the national News Awards Features Journalist of the Year. In 2011, he was named Queensland Journalist of the Year at the Clarion Awards for excellence in Queensland journalism. His debut literary fiction novel, Boy Swallows Universe, will be published in June 2018, by HarperCollins.

Session: This book changed my life (Fri July 27, 6.00-7.30pm)

Paula Doneman, senior investigative producer and crime journalist, Seven News (@PaulaD7news) Avatar

Paula Doneman, senior investigative producer and crime journalist, Seven News (@PaulaD7news)

Paula Doneman launched her career at The Weekend Independent in 1992, where her work triggered Queensland’s first commission of inquiry into the illicit drug trade. After four years, Paula moved to The Courier-Mail where she became a co-founder of the Courier-Mail Investigative Unit; she held the role of the Courier-Mail’s chief police reporter and then crime editor for over a decade, then spent another two years as crime editor at the Sunday Mail. In 2011 Paula moved to Seven News Brisbane, taking up the role as senior investigative producer and crime journalist. In 2013 Paula won a Walkley for best TV story with her colleague Robert Ovadia, for their exposé of an illegal sex ring within the Australian Defence Force. She has won two Les Kennedy Awards, including the 2014 Les Kennedy Award for outstanding investigative reporting on the Jedi council, and the second in 2017 for “Murder Uncovered” on the unsolved murder of Leanne Holland. “Murder Uncovered” also won last year’s Queensland Clarion award for Television Feature Documentary, one of four Queensland Clarion awards Paula has won. Paula is also a podcaster and the author of a true crime book Things a Killer Would Know.

Session: Saturday morning with the papers (Sat July 28, 10.30-11.30am)

Carrie Fellner, investigative journalist, The Sydney Morning Herald (@carriefellner) Avatar

Carrie Fellner, investigative journalist, The Sydney Morning Herald (@carriefellner)

Carrie Fellner has spent more than two years investigating the health consequences of the toxic fire-fighting chemicals used on RAAF bases around Australia. Last year, while working for the Newcastle Herald, her multi-platform series “The Sorrow on Cabbage Tree Road” produced compelling evidence of a potential cancer cluster at Williamtown. It won the 2017 Walkley Award for Coverage of Community and Regional Affairs. Carrie also received a team Walkley and a joint Young Walkley in 2016 for her earlier reporting on the contamination crisis. Carrie started her career in broadcast journalism, having graduated from Sydney’s University of Technology in 2010. Her first reporting job was with a commercial radio station in Lithgow. Carrie quickly established her credentials as an investigative journalist after joining the Newcastle Herald in early 2016 and this year, has taken on a new role as an investigations reporter with the Sydney Morning Herald.

Session: Storyology @ Sydney Ideas – How can investigative journalism projects change the world? (Mon July 30, 6.00-7.30pm)

Catherine Fox, freelance business writer (@corporatefox) Avatar

Catherine Fox, freelance business writer (@corporatefox)

Catherine Fox is one of Australia’s leading commentators on women and the workforce. A Walkley award-winning journalist, author and presenter, she is regularly invited to address audiences around Australia with frequent guest appearances in the media. During a long career with the Financial Review, she edited several sections of the newspaper, and wrote the weekly Corporate Woman column. She has also published four books, including her latest Stop Fixing Women (NewSouth), which, along with her journalism,awarded her the 2017 Walkley Award for Women’s Leadership in Media. In 2012 Catherine helped establish the annual Westpac/Financial Review 100 Women of Influence Awards. She is a member of the Australian Defence Force Gender Equality Advisory Board and Australian Women Donors Network board, and co-founder of the Sydney Women’s Giving Circle.

Session: Power shifts (Sat July 28, 1.30-2.30pm)

Emma Griffiths, presenter, Focus, ABC Radio (@EJGriffiths) Avatar

Emma Griffiths, presenter, Focus, ABC Radio (@EJGriffiths)

From breaking news and political reporting to the latest in entertainment, Emma Griffiths loves the variety of presenting radio on her program Focus. Earlier in her career, Emma spent four years posted in Moscow, reporting on the school siege in Beslan, the political upheavals of Ukraine’s “orange” revolution, travelling to the Arctic circle and of course, keeping a close eye on Vladimir Putin.  Emma’s coverage in Beslan won her a highly commended nod in the 2005 Walkley Awards.

The road from Moscow led to Sydney and Canberra for a long stint of political reporting, including several years reporting from the Parliament House bureau. Emma has moved back to her home town and previously presented ABC Brisbane Drive. Like many of her listeners, Emma is dealing with the juggle of raising of two young children, full time work and creating some balance in life. Emma’s local knowledge and love of her hometown, combined with her warmth and sense of humour, makes her great company as she focuses on Brisbane every weekday morning from 10am.

Session: Shooting the storm (Sat July 28, 12.00-1.00pm)

Rachel Hancock, deputy editor of The Courier-Mail and Sunday Mail (@RachHan) Avatar

Rachel Hancock, deputy editor of The Courier-Mail and Sunday Mail (@RachHan)

Described as one of News Corp’s brightest editors, Rachel Hancock rose through the ranks at Adelaide’s Sunday Mail and The Advertiser to become the first female editor of one of Australia’s most successful tabloids, the NT News. Her fierce leadership saw not only crocs and witty headlines splashed across the front pages, but also Walkley Award-winning investigative journalism and strong campaigns, including one which drove petrol prices down for Territorians. After immersing herself in Territory life, Rachel moved to Brisbane last year to take up a role as the deputy editor of The Courier-Mail and Sunday Mail.

Session: Power shifts (Sat July 28, 1.30-2.30pm)

Professor Annamarie Jagose, Dean, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Sydney (@arjagose) Avatar

Professor Annamarie Jagose, Dean, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Sydney (@arjagose)

Annamarie Jagose is internationally known as a scholar in feminist and lesbian/gay studies. She is the author of four monographs from leading international publishers including Cornell University Press, Duke University Press and New York University Press. She is also an award-winning novelist and short story writer. Her last novel, Slow Water, was a historical nineteenth-century fiction of a four-month sea voyage from London and landfall at Sydney. It won the Deutz Medal for Fiction at the Montana New Zealand Book Awards, the Vance Palmer Prize for Fiction at the Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards and was shortlisted for the Miles Franklin Literary Award.

Professor Jagose held positions in the Department of English with Cultural Studies at the University of Melbourne and the Department of Film, Television and Media Studies at the University of Auckland before coming to the University of Sydney in 2011 to take up the position of Head of the School of Literature, Art and Media. From 2017, Professor Jagose is the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.

Session: Storyology @ Sydney Ideas – How can investigative journalism projects change the world? (Mon July 30, 6.00-7.30pm)

Sean Leahy, cartoonist, The Courier-Mail (@leahycartoons) Avatar

Sean Leahy, cartoonist, The Courier-Mail (@leahycartoons)

Sean Leahy is the cartoonist on The Courier-Mail. He was previously cartoonist on The West Australian, The Sunday Times and The Sunday Independent. A two-time Walkley Award nominee he has published nine books of his cartoons and is syndicated internationally through the Cartoonists & Writers Syndicate, New York.

Session: Saturday morning with the papers (Sat July 28, 10.30-11.30am)

Bri Lee, writer & editor (@brieloiselee) Avatar

Bri Lee, writer & editor (@brieloiselee)

Bri Lee is a writer and editor whose work has been published in The Guardian, Griffith Review, the VICE network and elsewhere, and she regularly appears on ABC Radio National. Her first book, Eggshell Skull, was published in June this year and is a memoir of sexism in the justice system. In 2016, Bri was the recipient of the inaugural Kat Muscat Fellowship, and in 2017 was one of Griffith Review‘s Queensland writing fellows. She is the founding editor of the quarterly print periodical Hot Chicks with Big Brains, which has published nonfiction about women and their work since 2015. In 2018 Bri received a Commonwealth Government of Australia scholarship and stipend to work on her second book at the University of Queensland. She is qualified to practice law, but doesn’t.

Session: Power shifts (Sat July 28, 1.30-2.30pm)

Melissa Lucashenko, writer Avatar

Melissa Lucashenko, writer

Melissa Lucashenko is a Bundjalung novelist and essayist. Her novel Mullumbimby (UQP) was awarded the 2013 Deloitte Queensland Literary Award for Fiction, won the 2014 Victorian Premier’s Literary Award for Indigenous Writing, and was longlisted for the Miles Franklin, Stella, and Dublin IMPAC Literary Prize in 2015. Melissa is also a Walkley Award winner for her non-fiction, as well as a founding member of the women’s rights organisation, Sisters Inside. In 2016 she was awarded the $80,000 Copyright Agency Limited Fellowship to write her forthcoming novel, Too Much Lip (UQP).

Session: This book changed my life (Fri July 27, 6.00-7.30pm)

Nick Moir, chief photographer, The Sydney Morning Herald (@nampix) Avatar

Nick Moir, chief photographer, The Sydney Morning Herald (@nampix)

Nick Moir’s passion is capturing the dramatic environmental phenomena of Australia, from its ragged lightning and dust storms and blackening bushfires to the devastating effects of climate change. He received a World Press Photo award for coverage of the destructive 2002-03 bushfire season and Australian Press Photographer of the Year in 2002 for a series on Sydney’s severe weather. In 2009 he was named International Environmental Photographer of the Year in the Changing Climates category, an annual prize of the University of Westminster. Nick lives in Sydney and is chief photographer The Sydney Morning Herald and a founding member of Oculi.

Session: Shooting the storm (Sat July 28, 12.00-1.00pm)

George Negus, journalist, television presenter & author, Negus Media (@GeorgeNegus) Avatar

George Negus, journalist, television presenter & author, Negus Media (@GeorgeNegus)

George Negus AM is one of Australia’s best known media professionals with four decades of experience in Australian commercial and public television current affairs. He has worked independently producing books and factual television via Negus Media International since the early 1990s. After developing his passion for international affairs on Nine’s 60 Minutes, George became founding presenter of ABC’s Foreign Correspondent. He continued with our national broadcaster as host/interviewer of Australia Talks and George Negus Tonight before returning to international affairs at Dateline on SBS and joining  TEN Network’s The Project as a regular panellist. Since 2010 and minus a camera crew, Negus Media has designed and led tours called “Travel for the Mind”, introducing Australians to destinations where George has reported on significant world events in the Middle East, Iran, Cuba, Venezuela and Russia. His books include The World From IsIam; The World From Italy and The World from Down Under, plus a children’s series Trev the Truck.

Session: This book changed my life (Fri July 27, 6.00-7.30pm)

Gerard Ryle, director, International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (@RyleGerard) Avatar

Gerard Ryle, director, International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (@RyleGerard)

Gerard Ryle is the director of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. He led the worldwide teams of journalists working on the Panama Papers and Paradise Papers investigations, the biggest collaborations in journalism history. Before joining as ICIJ’s first non-American director in September 2011, Ryle spent more than 20 years working as an investigative reporter and editor in Australia. His work as a journalist began in his native Ireland. He was later a Knight-Wallace Journalism Fellow at the University of Michigan, and in 2013 he accepted an honorary doctorate from the University of Liege, on behalf of ICIJ. Ryle has won or shared in journalism awards from seven different countries, including the Pulitzer Prize, three George Polk Awards, five Walkley Awards, and honors from the Society of Professional Journalists, Overseas Press Club of America, the New York Press Club, the Barlett and Steele Awards, Investigative Reporters and Editors, and Harvard University. He and his ICIJ colleagues also shared an Emmy Award with the U.S. television program 60 Minutes.

Session: Storyology @ Sydney Ideas – How can investigative journalism projects change the world? (Mon July 30, 6.00-7.30pm)

Alison Sandy, FOI editor, Seven Network (@alisonsandy) Avatar

Alison Sandy, FOI editor, Seven Network (@alisonsandy)

Alison Sandy has been lodging Freedom of Information (FOI) applications since starting her career 20 years ago. In May 2014, she joined the Seven Network to become the nation’s first female FOI editor, where on average two FOI-related stories are put to air each week. Last year, she lodged more than 800 applications nationwide. Alison has successfully fought and won several appeals for access to documents under FOI laws, and uncovered details that have contributed to positive changes in legislation. In 2017, she was a finalist for two Walkley awards following exclusive stories on child brides, and a year-long FOI investigation into the extent of sexual assaults across the nation’s 39 universities. For the latter, she won an award from the United Nations Association of Australia for the Promotion of Gender Equality – Empowerment of Women and Girls.

Session: Storyology @ Sydney Ideas – How can investigative journalism projects change the world? (Mon July 30, 6.00-7.30pm)

Mark Schoofs, investigations & projects editor, BuzzFeed News (US) (@SchoofsFeed) Avatar

Mark Schoofs, investigations & projects editor, BuzzFeed News (US) (@SchoofsFeed)

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Mark Schoofs is the investigations and projects editor for BuzzFeed News. While working at The Village Voice, Schoofs won the 2000 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for his eight-part series on AIDS in Africa. Before moving to BuzzFeed in 2014, he worked as a senior editor at ProPublica, and before that as a foreign correspondent and investigative reporter for The Wall Street Journal, where he was part of a team that won a Pulitzer for the paper’s coverage of the September 11 attacks. He earned a B.A. in philosophy from Yale University, where he later taught a journalism seminar. Schoofs holds two United States patents and has been sued by Donald Trump’s personal lawyer, who ultimately dropped the suit.

Session: Saturday morning with the papers (Sat July 28, 10.30-11.30am)

Session: Storyology @ Sydney Ideas – How can investigative journalism projects change the world? (Mon July 30, 6.00-7.30pm)

Cathie Schnitzerling, editor, ABC Regional, Queensland (@cathieschnitz) Avatar

Cathie Schnitzerling, editor, ABC Regional, Queensland (@cathieschnitz)

Cathie Schnitzerling has three decades of experience at two commercial television networks, the national public broadcaster and the largest department in the Queensland government. Cathie is currently the ABC’s regional editor for Queensland. Previously she held the position of director of news in both Brisbane and Sydney for the Ten Network for almost ten years. Her career includes television and radio reporting and presenting, television production (news, public affairs and documentaries), marketing, internal communications, media strategy and crisis management, social media development, and managing online services. Cathie has also produced short films and an independent documentary for SBS.

Session: Power shifts (Sat July 28, 1.30-2.30pm)

Adam Suckling, CEO, Copyright Agency (@SucklingAdam) Avatar

Adam Suckling, CEO, Copyright Agency (@SucklingAdam)

Adam Suckling joined the Copyright Agency as Chief Executive in August 2015 from News Corp, where he was the Director of Policy, Corporate Affairs & Community Relations. Prior to that, he was the director of policy and corporate affairs for FOXTEL and before this held a commercial role running FOXTEL’s wholesale group. Before joining FOXTEL, Adam worked for a period in Singapore, as a director in SingTel’s international group, which oversaw the company’s investments across the Asia-Pacific. He was also general manager of regulatory affairs at Optus.

Session: This book changed my life (Fri July 27, 6.00-7.30pm)

Lenore Taylor, editor, Guardian Australia (@lenoretaylor) Avatar

Lenore Taylor, editor, Guardian Australia (@lenoretaylor)

Lenore Taylor is the editor of Guardian Australia. Over almost three decades of political reporting, she has won two Walkley awards and twice won the Paul Lyneham Award for excellence in press gallery journalism. She was the Australian Financial Review’s Europe correspondent in the early 2000s. She co-authored the book Shitstorm: Inside Labor’s Darkest Days, which examined the Rudd government’s response to the global economic crisis.

Session: Saturday morning with the papers (Sat July 28, 10.30-11.30am)

Hedley Thomas, national chief correspondent, The Australian Avatar

Hedley Thomas, national chief correspondent, The Australian

Hedley Thomas is a senior writer for The Australian. He excels in writing intensive investigative pieces, lengthy profiles and news articles. Hedley has won five Walkley Awards including the 2007 Gold Walkley for his reporting on Dr Haneef, an Indian doctor arrested in Brisbane on suspicion of terrorist links. Hedley started his career as a copyboy at The Gold Coast Bulletin and joined The Courier-Mail in 1988. He joined The Australian’s Brisbane bureau in 2006. Hedley’s international experience has ranged from reporting on the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Romanian revolution and the first Gulf War, to six years spent with the South China Morning Post as a senior reporter, features writer and deputy features editor. His latest project is an investigative podcast, The Teacher’s Pet.

Session: Killer stories: True crime & podcasts (Sat July 28, 3.00-4.00pm)

Michael West, founder & editor, MichaelWest.com.au (@MichaelWestBiz) Avatar

Michael West, founder & editor, MichaelWest.com.au (@MichaelWestBiz)

Michael West spent two decades working as a journalist, stockbroker, editor and finance commentator before striking out on his own in July 2016. Having worked for eight years investigating financial markets and big business for Rupert Murdoch’s The Australian and another eight years for The Age and Sydney Morning Herald at Fairfax Media, West has established michaelwest.com.au to focus on journalism of high public interest. West was appointed Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Sydney’s School of Social and Political Sciences last year. The role involves working with the School’s Sydney Democracy Network, investigating money in politics, corporate influence and the intersection between government and big business.

Session: Storyology @ Sydney Ideas – How can investigative journalism projects change the world? (Mon July 30, 6.00-7.30pm)